Archive for the ‘Insights’ Category

Last week I went to the MRS Connected World conference, a really excellent event gathering together an inspiring crowd to talk about new technologies and consumer behaviours. Not just to listen – though listening was great! I was also putting forward the FACE point of view on a panel with Tom Ewing of Brainjuicer and Paul Edwards of Working Plural & JKR.

Our topic: “cutting through the noise”. Digital media & technology has generated a dramatic shift – for the first time in history, there’s not a shortage of information but an excess. But how to make sense of it all? How to find the insight amid the flood?

Our session was kindly written up by Research Live, so I won’t go into the details here. Instead, I want to pick up on a really smart question from an audience member – How do you do social media research with real rigour?

Great question. How do you move beyond a set of observations made on a vast and potentially rather amorphous dataset, to get to something we might actually call research? On the spot I came up with 3 ways  - but on reflection, there are more.

Here’s my top 10 ways to make your social media research rock solid:

1. Capture the complete universe

If the dataset’s incomplete (and especially if you don’t know what’s missing), you can’t say anything about how your findings relate to the wider universe. Tweets found directly through Twitter search are really no more than anecdote until you can contextualise them within a meaningful totality of everything that’s going on in social.

figure13

Image source: Mapping The Global Twitter Heartbeat: The Geography of Twitter, by Kalev H. Leetaru et al., 2012

So make sure you’re using a social media research tool that’s built on top of Twitter Firehose (the 100% data API) and robust blog, forum & news data collection.

Of course there’s still a gap between “everything said in social” and “everything people think”. But that’s true for every research method – this is a risk we can only minimise, never remove entirely.

2. Your search strategy is critical

Great data sources aren’t enough on their own – you’ve got to set them up right. If you’re searching for a particular category (e.g. haircare), you need to be confident you’ve collected the whole category – every possible way people can talk about hair, from products to styles and stylists, and verbs & adjectives as well as nouns. Just searching for all mentions of “hair” won’t cut it – you’re not capturing a meaningful totality.

How to build good search syntax: Brainstorm. Then test it in Twitter & Google search, then iterate to add in new words & phrases that come up. Analyst experience is key here to build a search strategy that’s both comprehensive and focused.

3. Qualify your quant insights

Social data is qual data at a mass scale, says Francesco D’Orazio, our chief technologist.

Numbers on their own aren’t insights. Positive sentiment is 20% – so what? What are people saying? What are the needs and emotions driving that figure, and why is it higher for one brand than another? Read, synthesise, code. Quote the actual messages, show the verbatim. Keep the people visible in how you tell your insights.

4. Quantify your qual insights

Say you’re doing an innovation project, find out that fighting frizz is the most important consumer haircare need. Your immediate client might love the depth of qual insight you can build from beauty blogs and forums… But she’s also got to communicate that insight around a larger organisation & to lots of people who won’t ever read your full deck.

So quantify that qual insight and rank it against other needs. Savvy use of Boolean search strings – NEAR operators & smart exclusion terms – can give you sensible approximate volumes for almost any concept. You’ll not capture every nuance, to be sure – but it’ll help support that qual insight as a really solid finding.

puggit pug AND rabbit

(Ok, not really an example of quantifying qual insights – but a very cute example of Boolean syntax!)

5. Can another analyst find the same insights?

Classic research methods such as data coding still can have a key role to play in turning social media data into insight. It provides a structured template for content analysis that helps iron out bias from the analyst’s own preconceptions. Instead you’ve got a random sample of 200 messages and a structured grid, and it’s easy to review across team to help standardise what you mean by particular categories and concepts.

6. Benchmark

Is this finding real? How much does it actually matter? Display your research findings contextualised against other brands, other categories, or as share of voice – so your reader can get a sense of proportion.

7. State what you don’t know, or can’t prove

  • e.g. “This visualisation is based on Twitter data, a channel used by 26% of the UK population.”
  • “Social media messages almost never identify a store by its exact street address, and only 1.6% of tweets have geolocation. Consequently we cannot locate the se complaints to specific store, only town or region level.”
  • “Social media data includes only information that is publicly available on the web, and not private email or text message data” (yes we get this one!)

Make the gaps explicit. It shows you know what you’re talking about – and helps ensure your insights are interpreted accurately. Overclaim isn’t rigorous!

8. Test hypotheses. Test a null hypothesis.

Having hypotheses makes your data useful – instead of just drawing a picture of the landscape, you’re trying to find out something specific. But in the spirit of scientific enquiry, proving a hypothesis isn’t just going out looking for data that supports it. It’s also about looking for data that supports the null hypothesis – the counter-possibility that nothing is happening, or the opposite. Look for both – and if all the evidence really falls on one side, then you can be confident that your finding is really robust.

Null hypothesis cartoon aliens socks

Testing the null hypothesis or counter-factuals  is also a great way to find interesting things you weren’t expecting (see point 10!)

9. Triangulate against other data sources

Extract everything you can from your client, from sales figures to  qual research to semiotics decks.  Turn these into hypotheses. Is your research supporting these? Building on them? Taking them a new direction? Or disagreeing entirely? All are legitimate outcomes – and putting your insights in this context makes them much easier for your client to use.

10. Don’t do social media research if it’s not the right way to answer your question

A contrarian point for closing – but here at FACE we’re honest about the fact that social media data can’t answer all research questions. Its genius is that the data we’re analysing is largely spontaneous and unprompted, making it a great way to find “unknown unknowns’ – the things you didn’t even know you wanted to know, or needed to ask.

Unknown-Knowns-invert-657x600

But sometimes you’ve got really specific questions to answer – how far are consumers prepared to trade off price vs. quality, perhaps, or whether a different shade of blue would make a better bottle top. And I’m afraid people just aren’t talking about bottle cap colours in social media… So you’d need to ask them directly: time for a focus group! Not social.

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So that’s 10 ways to make your social media research really robust. Any more to add? Get in touch with us on Twitter – we’re @FaceResearch – and tell us your top tips! I (Jess) do a bunch of tweeting for FACE, so let’s keep the conversation going.

Or if you’ve got a really thorny research problem and you’re looking for a rigorous solution, get in touch with my colleague James on James.Hirst@Facegroup.com – we’d love to talk it through with you.

 

Winston“The water was not fit to drink. To make it palatable, we had to add whisky. By diligent effort, I learned to like it.” — Winston Churchill

Amongst all spirits, whisky holds a very particular place. From teenagers to world leaders, from whisky and soda to $460,000 bottle – a 1946 Macallan in a Lalique decanter was auctioned at this price in 2010, whisky proves being more than simply a category of alcohol, but a potent landmark of social and economic belonging.

The whisky market is diverse, but can be divided in two main categories: Scotch (i.e. distilled in Scotland and matured for a minimum of three years in oak casks) and non-Scotch whiskies. Both have experienced continuous growth, with some particularly dynamic markets in the last couple of years in emerging countries, especially India and China. Scotch whiskies represent around 85% of Scottish food and drink exports and nearly a quarter of the British total, according to the Scottish Whisky Association.

Such a success in the context of our digital era questions us about the way this phenomenon echoes on social media, how consumers take part into the whisky related social discussion around the world, and what insight can social media bring for the whisky industry.

This blog is the first of a series about the whisky industry that will demonstrate several ways we, as social media researchers, can investigate a broad social dataset and make sense of it thanks to the use of different research techniques and integration of other data sources like sales data.

In this first blog, we’ll have a look at the big picture: identifying how whisky-related social discussion is naturally featuring, and how whisky in social media differs from actual consumer behaviour.

Simply looking at raw social data volumes can be misleading since it doesn’t take in consideration the actual population size of each country, and the proportion of its population using social media. In order to balance the countries’ weight and get a better idea of the countries where whisky discussion is getting more traction, we weighted each country to its population:

Average whisky related social posts per 1000 capita 

Screen Shot 2014-05-11 at 19.30.42

Content posted between August 15th to August 31st,
including “whiskey”, “whisky”, “whiskeys” or “whiskies”.
Collected  by Pulsar, our social media monitoring tool.

What patterns do we see, and why?

Whisk(e)y as a share of British and Irish identity - Ireland is the country eliciting the most social discussion per capita, demonstrating the vitality and weight of the whiskey topic in this country. The second place of United Kingdom in both overall social volumes and discussion per capita, also highlights the importance of the whisky industry and the passion towards this spirit, as home of Scotch whisky – at least for the moment!

The home of Bourbon trails behind Ireland and UK – The United States remains a major country for whisky discussion, especially considering the impressive overall amount of content originating from this territory. But the volumes per capita put this domination in perspective, suggesting that Irish and British are more passionate about whisky.

Whisky proves a healthy topic of discussion in South America and Oceania - A few less populated countries, especially in South America and Oceania, elicit a comparatively high level of whisky conversation, proving their attachment to this beverage, namely Uruguay (6th), New Zealand (7th), Venezuela (8th), and Australia (9th).

Now we’ve drawn a map of social media whisky discussion, getting the most of this landscape implies connecting it to the reality of whisky consumption.

To do so, we are using Euromonitor whisky consumption country data per capita.

Annual whisky consumption/capita (in liters)

Screen Shot 2014-05-11 at 19.35.25

Source : Euromonitor, Worldbank

This data offers us a ranking of the biggest whisky drinkers that we can compare to the ranking of the biggest whisky “talkers”, giving us a new perspective over the whisky market opportunities in terms of social strategy.

Whisky Drinkers versus Whisky Talkers

Screen Shot 2014-05-11 at 19.41.43

* Searches didn’t include words in Hindi, Japanese or Chinese
alphabets, 
so these ranks are likely to be higher in reality

A correlation between whisky consumption and whisky social discussion

Out of the top 10 countries with the higher consumption of whisky per capita, 7 also feature in the top 10 countries with the more whisky related social discussion per capita. However the ranking is quite different…

Less social verbose, more drinking?

Two groups of countries emerge:

On the one hand, countries that feature higher in the consumption ranking than in the social discussion ranking. Including Uruguay, Australia, India or South Africa, this group bears a high potential for social marketers: healthy markets with a lack of social media structure, thus an opportunity for whisky brands to own the category with targeted efforts. The emblem of this group is France, that ranks at the first position for whisky consumption, but only 19th for whisky related social discussion. Some could think that French people drink too much whisky to be able to post their experience on social media. Being well placed to answer this exaggerated statement, I tend to consider that the reason is more likely to lie within cultural and media habits, both in terms of whisky consumption and social media use. This will be the topic of a future blog.

On the other hand, countries that feature higher in the social discussion ranking than in the consumption ranking. And this comprises almost all main whisky producers, namely United Kingdom and Ireland: in addition to a healthy discussion around the whisky consumption itself, distilleries, associations, news websites and organisations contributes to the fact that whisky also feature as a business and economy related topic.
This first glance at the whisky social landscape opens quite a few doors that we will enter in the next couple of months, and that will lead to how we dig more qualitatively into social discussion:

  • Scotch/Bourbon fracture: how is it tangible on social media, and which is winning the social battle?
  • Booze vs Nectar: whisky’s duality
  • A whisky connoisseur social audience
  • The French enigma: understand the specificities of the French social whisky environment
  • Whisky brands: what is their place within the social conversation, and which ones are stealing the show

Stay tuned!

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anthony

Anthony Fradet is a social media research manager in FACE’s London office. Since gaining a Masters degree from Sorbonne University, Anthony has spent 5 years working for French market research companies, with quantitative, qualitative and social media focus. Before joining Face in 2013, he was responsible for a unique partnership between a top 5  ’traditional’ market research agency (CSA) and a social media research agency (linkfluence). Get in touch with Anthony via LinkedIn or Twitter.

As social media researchers we help clients make sense of people’s online behavior, which is of course complex. While they have their uses, KPIs such as volume and sentiment can only get you so far. One key limitation is that they only measure what people say – not what they do as well.

Social media research is moving beyond keyword tracking, something we’ve been innovating here at FACE with Pulsar’s content and audience tracking technologies. To really dig into online activity, we need to analyse metadata, the information spun off by social behavior, just as much as the messages people produce. And we need to embrace a wider range of methodologies drawn from the field of computational social statistics.

We can do this through social network analysis (SNA), a research framework giving us the tools and concepts to investigate questions such as how content is shared and how communities are formed.

We are going to dive into examples in more detail for our ‘Network Analysis for Market Research’ blog series, covering topics including:

  • Visualising networks to make sense of large & complex data sets
  • Methods for identifying influencers
  • Identifying communities
  • Tracking how networks evolve over time
  • Mapping how information spreads
  • Overlaying networks with other metrics

For great examples of how we can benefit from investigating social structures using network analysis you need look no further that FACE’s research carried out by Francesco D’Orazio and Jess Owens for Twitter on How Videos Go Viral, & How Stuff Spreads: Gangnam Style vs. Harlem Shake in partnership with Datasift.

Twitter-viral-video-network-maps-500x494

In our blog series we’re going to investigate methodologies used in these projects, provide additional examples of network analysis, dive into some theory & explain practically what this means for the process of social media research.

If you have any questions about what I’ve discussed in this blog or about our forthcoming blog series then please do get in touch.

Part 1 of the blog series has now been published. Read about Identifying Influencers with Social Network Analysis here

As Ray Poynter notes, mobile has finally arrived in market research!

 “people have been saying mobile is the next big thing for over 15 years, even in the days when that meant SMS, or WAP, or writing 100s of apps for different types of phones. At conferences and client sessions I keep being asked “So, when will mobile be the big thing?” The answer is that it is now a big thing, and it has been for probably 18 months or more.

What’s notable though is that industry discussion is still oriented around the ‘grand dames’ of the market research toolkit: surveys (now moving from online to mobile, albeit sometimes “accidental mobile”) and CATI (telephone interviewing). Here at FACE we’re wondering, what about qual?

Well, let’s start talking about mobile qual! We’re excited to have research director Sharmila Subramanian writing a series of articles for us sharing her vast experience of mobile research methods, something she’s built up over many years of research with Nokia in particular.

Mobile research

First, when do you need to use mobile research methods? Sharmila shares three case studies:

Why mobile is useful: 

Here at FACE, we are committed to trying to root consumer understanding and resultant insights within context as much as possible.  This requires us to be able to understand consumer moments and interactions when they happen – not just in the home, not just in the research environment. Out of any tool for capturing thoughts and behaviour, mobile presents the best means of doing so.

Beyond this, mobile provides a simple and intuitive interface for capturing consumer attitudes and behaviours for a number of obvious, but important reasons:

1.  It’s people’s primary communication device

2. It’s an extension of people’s bodies and selves: always with them, always on. This makes it invaluable in gathering in-situ understanding

3. It’s the most personal device that people own, so it’s a fantastic platform for capturing more  private or personal thoughts and behaviours

4.  People are used to engaging through apps, making a mobile research app a logical research interface

This is not to say that mobile should be utilised for any & every research activity. It is a one-way method of research, with little scope for researcher-participant interaction. As a result, it is not for briefs or lines of enquiry that require a great deal of laddering and researcher probing in real time.

Moreover, its very nature does not lend itself to long form, highly considered response. When was the last time you tried to write something akin to an essay on your mobile?  I bet it was pretty painful.  Don’t expect any different for a research participant!

Three use cases for qualitative mobile research

From our own experience on a range of projects, mobile research comes into its own on three types of briefs:

Mobile research FACE App

1. Understanding response to concepts:

Whilst we would not advocate a mobile-only methodology for concept testing and development, mobile can prove an invaluable supplement to F2F methodologies where we wish research participants to “live” with concepts beyond the confines of the focus group facility. Initial reads on concepts often give us an understanding of their initial impact and wow factor. However, getting participants to then live with the proposition, and document when they see roles for certain ideas and concepts via mobile, can go much further in identifying their potential usefulness, and ability to fulfil needs within the real world.

On a recent project using FACE’s mobile research app, this approach proved invaluable in deepening understanding around a concept for a new service.  Whilst an online community and groups gave understanding of the initial comprehension and appeal of that concept, subsequent mobile research gave us a richer picture of where participants actually saw a role for the proposition – in terms of where, when, how they would utilise it and why.  We would not have been able to get that level of understanding by utilising other methods that rely on hindsight or recall.

2. Product trialing:

Mobile can come into its own in terms of understanding product usage and response – ultimately, it gives us the ability to understand those moments in-situ, as they happen.  And it makes it easier for the user to document those moments – no paper diary completion, no need for recalling of hazy memories on an online community or in a group.  Everything from first impressions of a new product, to first and repeat usage, to understanding how response to a product can change over time can be readily captured within mobile research. Moreover, it gives us the ability to understand all of those things across a variety of contexts, times of day, as well as the social dimension that may be at play.  As a result, we get closer to a more holistic understanding of product usage.

A recent example of the power of mobile for product trial can be seen in a project FACE conducted looking to understand response to a new product format.  FACE’s mobile app was used by a range of participants over a week to understand their first impressions of the product, how they used it, the triggers and barriers to use, and how their response changed over time.  This helped us to define the key benefits and use cases for the product prior to launch, as well as helping to provide starter thoughts for which elements of the product experience future communications should leverage.

However, the approach also proved powerful in providing a wealth of rich multimedia material that could be utilised by the client to provide more compelling evidence of the value of the product.

Mobile research FACE App

3. Shopper interaction:

The very mobile nature of the, well, mobile, clearly lends itself to helping to better understand the shopper experience. Whether in terms of gaining learnings on retail environment, in-store communications, or product placement, the discrete form, and bite-sized mode of interaction of the mobile makes it ideal for consumers to gather quick thoughts, images, and documentation of journeys within store.

FACE employed a mobile approach for understanding response to a new store layout format for a well known food and drink brand. This was invaluable in gaining firsthand accounts of what was a new concept in-store – accounts that were not influenced by researcher presence. The unmediated nature of this capture was essential in identifying exactly what the key hooks, and turn-offs of the new format were, and helped provide a compelling story for the client, through the use of raw, consumer generated content, to help our client sell the concept to retailers.

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So, that’s an initial overview of three times mobile research is one of the best methods we’ve got in our market research toolkit. Next up: getting the most out of a mobile approach – the do’s, the don’ts, and  best practice for making a mobile methodology a success.

If you’d like to discuss this further with Sharmila, contact her at Sharmila@FaceGroup.com, on LinkedIn or Twitter @SharmilaSub. To stay in touch with more of our qual thinking and methodology knowledge-sharing, join our mailing list.

While growing up in Singapore, I don’t recall visiting art galleries or events as a regular activity, either in school or in my own leisure time. Art, for me, was merely another subject in school, where you get some fun out of making colour imprints from cut-up tomatoes and potatoes. There were organized annual art & craft competitions where only the best pieces would be displayed – the less good pieces would be shelved at home for closed-door appreciation. In my memory, there was little about exploring art.

Things have changed dramatically in the recent years. There is an upbeat tempo in the art scene in this region. Unlike in the past, art has become more disposable and accessible – more informal pop-up locations than formal museums; more free and open events than having to pay for expensive entrance tickets; more recognition of local artists rather than only foreign artists whose names we can’t even enunciate; more close-to-heart topics than abstract art that we can’t connect with .

In this post, I will share some of my “art encounters in Asia” with you and conclude with some thoughts on how this changes the way we approach advertising and consumer insights.

The following 5 exhibitions are ones that have particularly captured my imagination. I feel it’s valuable for us to share these from us here in the Asia office back towards colleagues and readers in the West, so you can get a sense of what the new creativity looks like in this market and how it may differ from trends in London or New York galleries. Brands and marketers headquartered in the West need to pay attention to artistic expression coming from China, Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia etc  in order to understand the interests, questions, concerns and aesthetics at play in these markets. Brands’ visual languages can’t be imposed from the West on to “the rest” any more – they need to listen and learn.

On to the art:

Pop-up art exhibition in Georgetown (Penang, Malaysia) in a very dilapidated shop house 

13: Rebirth – a group exhibition in continuation of 12

A collection of installation and art pieces on the idea of Rebirth

Reflecting on the meaning of life, death, and rebirth

1 2

 Art space in K11 shopping mall in Shanghai, China

This is the world’s first art shopping mall

 A photography artwork inspired by the life-threatening air pollution in China

Artwork portray commoners in masks, each mask telling a different story

“I am afraid this will be a silence call for help”

 Reflects the relationship between environment and people and the vulnerability of life

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Bangkok Art & Culture Centre (Bangkok, Thailand)

I am Fat / Mannequins – an interpretation of beauty and perfection

Reflects the hard truths of acceptance against social expectations on beauty

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Singapore Art Museum (Singapore)

Actual-size installation on a Primary School in Yangon

Brings fresh perspective on living standards and education

Set in a developed country, this installation is a thought-starter to get people thinking about their own (comfortable) environment and dwellings

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 Noise Singapore 2013[J1] 

An annual open-public event dedicated to recognize the creative works of youths – work ranges from art and design, music and photography

There is one of the photography pieces that were curated for 2013

This event encourages youths to showcase their creativity and infuse fresh perspectives

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Art is clearly another language to communicate meaning and emotions without language barriers. It opens up a different window to interpret the world, cultures, environment, politics, society and emotions. This brings about new values and perspectives, which may change our attitudes and behaviour.

The increasing vibrancy of the art scene in Singapore – and across a region becoming more affluent and more middle class – means potentially new public sphere for ideas. It allows more space for expression and creativity. By creative, I am not implying that everyone will become an artist, but that the audiences are able to realize themselves as capable and inspiring thinkers. There’s more of a public forum for people to discuss representation, and meaning, and creative ideas – and for these thoughts to feed back up and be heard by artists, brands and cultural institutions.

This changes how brands should approach consumers with their communication strategy. While a single-minded message is the rule-of-thumb, this doesn’t mean the delivery must be linear. With a changing consumer profile, consumers are capable interpreting meanings with broader perspectives, and brands that recognize this – who don’t feel they need to talk down to their audiences, but who trust them to be able to interpet complex imagery and narratives – have a chance to win a greater share of attention, personal recognition, and loyalty.

Many brands have succeeded in this – Coca Cola is a classic example that doesn’t need further introduction. Absolut Vodka continues to build buzz with its limited edition bottles with iconic designs. In 2013, Absolut Vodka put up its first Absolut Canvas exhibition dedicated to the art and creativity of the brand at the Singapore History Museum. Other brands advertised using creative art installations to connect with people in their daily lives.

We also need to move away from the traditional marketing hierarchy. Consumers are no longer ‘external’ stakeholders but ‘internal’ stakeholders, who can play a fundamental role in directing the brand strategies.  At FACE, we believe every consumer has a voice – hence it is essential for brands to engage with consumers at an early stage to shape the idea. Through co-creation workshops, brands can start conversations with consumers, build ideas and create stories together with them.

After all, it is an art to paint a full picture.

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Calin Chua is a Research Manager for Face Asia. She has worked on a diverse range of brands, including Starbucks and Nokia. 

Connect with her on LinkedIn or follow her on Twitter.